Ivan Bunin

Ivan Bunin
  • Full name: Ivan Bunin
  • Date of birth: 10 October 1870
  • Graduation:

    In 1881 he was sent to a public school in Yelets, but never completed the coursework and ended up being home-schooled

Ivan Bunin was born on October 10, 1870, in his old noble family estate in Voronezh province in Central Russia.

In 1881 he was sent to a public school in Yelets, but never completed the coursework and ended up being home-schooled. He never graduated college either.

When he was 17, he published one of his poems called “Over Nadson’s grave”. He worked as a corrector, a librarian, a statistician, a newspaper reporter. In the early 1890’s, he started to write prose. “Antonov Apples”, “Flowers of the Field”, “The gentleman from San-Francisco”, “Light Breathing”, “The Village” – these works brought him three Pushkin prizes of the Russian Science Academy. At the same time, he translated English and American literature, such as “The Song of Hiawatha” by Henry Longfellow or “Manfred” and “Cain” by Byron.
 
Bunin did not accept the Bolshevik power. After the October revolution, he moved to Odessa, where he intensively collaborated with the Volunteer anti-Bolshevik army. In February 1920, the red Army approached Odessa and he was forced to immigrate to France.

In this exile, he wrote the majority of his most popular works, such as the short stories “Mitya’s Love” and “Sunstroke”, the short story collection “Dark Avenues”, the novel “The Life of Arsenyev”. The Nobel prize for Literature was awarded to him in 1933 ‘for following through and developing with chastity and artfulness the traditions of Russian classic prose’. 

He kept writing poems till the end of his life. He died in 1953 in Paris, a half a year after Stalin’s death. They say that the novel “Resurrection” by Tolstoy was found open on his deathbed.

Работы в «Гоголь-центре»